Salary Calculator for Switzerland

Salary breakdown

Gross Income Tax Due Net Income
Yearly
Monthly
Please note that the above calculator does not include the cantonal and the municipality income taxes. Please use the official calculator to compute them.

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Gross Income
is the sum of all your earnings before any taxes have been deducted, minus any exemptions.
Net Income
is the money you take home after all taxes and contributions have been deducted from your gross salary.

Tax Due is the sum of all taxes and contributions that will be deducted from your gross salary. The deductions used in the above salary calculator assume you are not married and you have no dependents.

Income taxes
are levied at three different levels: at the federal level (in all cantons), at the cantonal level (based on the canton's own tax law and tax rates), and at the municipal level (each municipality in a canton is entitled to set their own communal tax rate within certain parameters). The above calculator includes only the federal tax. The federal tax is progressive and it ranges from 0% to 11.50%.
AHV, IV, EO
is an insurance scheme which offers cover for retired individuals and surviving dependents. It includes: Old Age and Survivors Insurance (AHV), Disability Insurance (IV) and Loss of Earnings Compensation Ordinance (EO). The Old Age and Survivors Insurance is the main pillar of the social insurance in Switzerland and all persons in gainful employment are required to pay this tax (up to ages 64 for women and 65 for men).
Unemployment Insurance (ALV)
is a compulsory Swiss social security insurance aiming at financing unemployment benefits. All employees (up to ages 64 for women and 65 for men) that pay OASI tax must also pay contributions to the Unemployment Insurance.
Accident Insurance (NBU)
it is tax payed by all employees working in Switzerland and it is required by law. Accident insurance covers medical expenses for accidents happening during working time but also during leisure time.
Occupational Pension
is the tax that contributes to the pension fund, also known as the 2nd pillar and sits on top of the 1st pillar of OASI. This tax enables the insured persons to maintain their previous standard of living even after they retire. The contributions to the pension scheme depend on the age of the employee. The above calculator assumes that the age of the employee is between 25-43 years and uses the minimum tax of 7%.
The information presented on this page is based on the Swiss fiscal regulations for 2016. Visit www.ch.ch for more details. No responsibility is taken for the correctness of this information.

Salary comparison

People searching for salaries in Switzerland also checked the salary calculator for Australia and the United Kingdom.
Rank your income! The chart below shows where you stand compared to the rest of the world. The minimum and the average salaries in the chart are net of tax.

Did you know?

The average monthly net salary in Switzerland (CH) is around 3800 CHF, with a minimum income of 2900 CHF per month. This places Switzerland on the 3rd place in the International Labour Organisation statistics for 2012.

All people living in Switzerland are liable for the taxation of their worldwide income and assets. The taxes are progressive, with higher rates being applied to higher income levels.
The income tax is levied at three different levels: at the federal level (in all cantons), at the cantonal level (based on the canton's own tax law and tax rates), and at the municipal level (each municipality in a canton is entitled to set their own communal tax rate within certain parameters).
Citizens and foreigners who live in Switzerland and have a residence permit (permit C), need to declare their income and assets in an annual tax return form. For employees who do not have a residence permit (permits B, L, etc.), the social security contributions and the income tax are deducted at source by the employers every month.

Located in the heart of Europe, Switzerland has four official languages: German (63.3%), French (22.7%), Italian (8.1%), and Romansh (0.5%).
The country has one of the highest standards of living in the world, having top rankings in areas such as: income, health, work-life balance, jobs, life satisfaction, housing, community, education, environment, civic engagement, and safety. The two largest cities in Switzerland, Zurich and Geneva are considered among the top ten most liveable cities in the world.